Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Reader's embroidery - Noddy in the rain

Shoba, a blog reader and a good friend, mailed me pictures of a pretty embroidered T.V cover - "Noddy in the rain".  At first glance,it looked just like any other embroidery - but when I paid a little more attention to the stitches- I was surprised by the variety of stitches she had used in the supposedly simple pattern.
Here's a pic.

 The pattern appears to be from a coloring book.Shoba has used crayon tinting for filling up Noddy. I love the way umbrella has been stitched up - a combination of blanket stitch and straight stitches at the base. I love that mop of hair stitched with french knots.
I wanted to show this to you all - it would be a nice little project for beginner's or a quick one for anyone who wants to stitch up something in a short time.
Shoba also made a note of all the stitches used in the pattern and mailed it along with the above pic .

From the crayon scribbles, I guess this is the pattern page where Shoba made her embroidery plan.Click on the pic for a clearer view.

Wonderful work,Shoba. Looking forward to more such creativity from you.

I hope you all enjoyed having a look at the different types of stitches used on this piece,just as I did. Imagination can work wonders, right?

Love,luck and sunshine,

Sunday, August 09, 2015

Pipli Applique from Orissa - Glimpses from the Monsoon Collective

Hi everyone!!
Here's my second post on what I witnessed during my visit to National Institute of Fashion Technology for the hundred hands exhibition.
I thought of posting this before the thrill of the visit to the Monsoon Collective wears off and the memories fade. And trust me, you're going to love this - just as I did.

Pipli is a small town in the state of Orissa and is famous for..yeah, I know you've read the title of this post..

The artist who was exhibiting his Pipli work was Mr. Purna Chandra Ghosh. I think I spent the maximum time with him. He was very patient and willing to answer many of my questions.The wall hangings are appliqued on canvas cloth. Apart from those he also had cushion covers and bedspreads.

Let me show you a couple of pics

Wall hangings on canvas
A slightly hazy pic of a tribal tree

He sensed my excitement and pulled out the replica of a piece which he said won him the National award. I couldn't get a full shot of it, but here is one part of it.

Then we moved on to bedspreads..

A bird with different types of fabrics

The other bird on top of the same bedspread

And then came out a double bedspread which was a result of five month effort. So awestruck was I, he just couldn't help grinning. Here is a part of the spread. The entire sheet is filled of similar squares. He had made a pair and one of them was sold the previous day.

Can't imagine the effort that would've gone into it!!

Here's a close up of one of the squares
At the end of it, I came off from the stall giving him "Boni" (first business for the day). 

My tree of life cushion covers
Those who do applique would understand that this is a single piece cut and then appliqued. A wrong cut, the whole piece has to be discarded.
A yum closeup!!
Well, that's the eye candy for today!!!

I hope you enjoyed just as I did. Have you tried applique? I must admit I am miserable with it. But I should try again.

Love,luck and sunshine,

Saturday, August 08, 2015

Lambadi embroidery- a few glimpses from the monsoon collective

Hi everyone,

Today morning I was at the National Institute of Fashion Technology campus in Bangalore enjoying the medley of crafts exhibited there at the Monsoon Collective by A Hundred Hands. 

It is not often that I get to see a craft based exhibition and I decided to use this opportunity to the maximum. I spent time talking to many of the artists and yeah,I emptied out my wallet too.. 

The Lambadi embroidery stall was the first one where I stopped at.
Lambadis are the gypsies of the south who originally belonged to Rajasthan and migrated here.The collective had two stalls - one from Lambadis of the state of Karnataka and one from Tamil Nadu.

This is a pic of the Karnataka Lambadi stall. Click on the pic for a better view.

The members of the stall.

..and this is what one of them was working on. Look at the label -it is a FabIndia product!!!

The triangles appeared to be blanket stitches. I should've spent more time there and learnt a stitch or two. But I was eager to visit as many as possible before my hubby and daughter lost patience and moved on

The next  Lambadi embroidery stall was one of the last I visited. This was being managed by a lady.
What captured my attention here were these framed pieces.

 Aren't they fabulous!!

Here's a closeup.

I talked to her and she explained how she had come across the small population of Lambadis in TamilNadu who had stopped wearing their traditional dresses and switched over to sarees .The traditional wear used to have plenty of embroideries on them -and not wearing them anymore meant no more embroidery. 

At one point there were only two among all of the Lambadi group who had some knowledge of the stitches used. The story of revival starts from here.The two ladies were made to take up the role of teachers and train fifty others. And thus Porgai (Pride in Lambadi dialect) was born. You can read the revival story here.Only after reading the article did I realize that the lady was Dr.Lalitha Regi ,who along with her husband set up the Tribal Health Initiative.

Again, I feel like kicking myself that I did not buy anything from her.Among the items on sale were small patches of embroidery that could be added on to fabrics. I could've gotten at least a couple just for the sake of understanding the stitches. But I didn't...aargh.

Sometimes, sensible thoughts creep in only after a long time. Anyways, hopefully in the next monsoon collective I'll get a chance again.

Well, that was about the embroidery in the exhibition today. In the next post ,I'll show you some great pics of another fantastic art.

Love,luck and sunshine,